Vintage Cameras

Yesterday I had the opportunity to look through my Fathers Vintage Camera Collection. I thought I would share them with you. 

The Mamiya C220 is a lightweight twin-lens reflex camera made in the early 1970s with interchangeable lenses ranging from 55 mm wide-angle to 250 mm telephoto. The camera accepts 120 and 220 rollfilms. The rack and pinion focusing system with a bellows makes it possible for close-up photography without attachments.

The straight film path has no sharp turns for absolute flatness of the film. (exert from Wikipedia)

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Kodak 620.  Self erecting, folding 620 roll film camera. Dated around 1937. A self erecting camera with a fairly robust spring to open the camera, this should never be allowed to spring open unrestrained,  as the volume of air required to fill the bellows was likely to suck the film in!  

Although 620 film is no longer available, the film itself is identical to 120 which is still is. The only difference is the size of the spools, all that is required is to wind 120 film onto 620 spools, a relatively straightforward exercise.

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Baby Brownie. A very cute and popular little bakelite camera made from 1934-41, designed by famed industrial designer Walter Dorwin Teague. (I think this is my Mum’s)

………………………………………………………………………….The Six-20 Brownie Junior box camera was made by Kodak in the US and Kodak Ltd. in the UK between May 1933 & April 1941. The US and UK models were entirely different in both construction and art-deco facia. Both took eight 6x9cm images on 620 film.Year 1934. With this Six-20 Brownie Junior, Kodak remained faithful to the principles which made the success of Brownies but  improved the way this camera was manufactured. 

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The paperboard remains the main component but metal (almost) replaced wood for the body. This camera manufactured in US has been proposed with two different front faces : black front face and art-decó face (below).  No diaphragm on this simple camera. The aperture, which consists of two holes, is selected by pulling a tab on top of the camera.

This model’s lens feature two focusing zones, “5-10 feet”, and “10 feet and beyond” selected by a lever below the lens, and an aperture selection slider. Introduced in March 1933, it was made until April 1941.

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After I carefully photographed each of the cameras, I repacked them into their box…all except one. The Mamiya. I decided the Mamiya and I needed to have some careful bonding time together.  Ill show you what I did next……. (I know you are excited!, so Ill post it now…..) Nat

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3 Comments

Filed under ...Interesting, Photography

3 responses to “Vintage Cameras

  1. Max

    Wow! …. I thought they were just boxes – you better give me a printout of all that info.

  2. Wow, we’ve come a long way with cameras! Thanks for sharing.

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